Christine Zeindler

Email: christine.zeindler@ubc.ca


 

The UN Decade of Ecosystem Restoration designation is intended to raise awareness of the importance of protecting and reviving ecosystems around the world for insects, plants animals and all other forms of life on the planet.

Researchers offer ideas to reimagine, recreate and restore our relationship with the environment 

On World Environment Day (June 5), the United Nations will officially announce that the years 2021 to 2030 will be designated the UN Decade of Ecosystem Restoration. This global designation is intended to raise awareness of the importance of protecting and reviving ecosystems around the world and moving toward a sustainable future.

UBCO experts are available to comment on how to restore and protect ecosystems, rewild gardens and create sustainable consumer behaviour to help achieve a greener relationship with the environment.

Ecosystem restoration

Dr. Adam Ford 
Assistant Professor, Irving K. Barber Faculty of Science
Canada Research Chair in Wildlife Restoration Ecology

  • Wildlife connectivity and road ecology
  • Human-wildlife conflict
  • Restoring wild food security
  • Indigenous-led restoration

Dr. Karen Hodges
Professor, Irving K. Barber Faculty of Science

  • Post-fire and post-logging ecosystem restoration
  • Grassland restoration 

Nancy Holmes
Associate Professor, Faculty of Creative and Critical Studies

  • Using art to raise awareness of wild pollinators: Border Free Bees
  • Empowering communities to engage in solutions for habitat loss
  • Transforming urban sites into pollinator pastures 

Dr. Bob Lalonde
Associate Professor, Irving K. Barber Faculty of Science

  • Strategies to improve insect diversity in an urban setting

Dr. Astrida Neimanis
Associate Professor, Faculty of Creative and Critical Studies and Irving K. Barber Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences

  • Water, wetland and oceans restoration
  • Human imagination of and relationships to damaged ecosystems
  • Arts-sciences collaborations on restoration

Dr. Rebecca Tyson
Professor, Irving K. Barber Faculty of Science

  • Restoring agricultural landscapes for wild bees

Waste management

Dr. Cigdem Eskicioglu or Dr. Abbas Milani
Professors, School of Engineering

  • Development of biodegradable single-use surgical gloves

Sustainable building practices

Dr. Lukas Bichler
Associate Professor, School of Engineering

  • Clean energy technology
  • Sustainable batteries

Dr. Solomon Tesfamariam
Professor, School of Engineering

  • Management of aging infrastructure
  • Building with sustainable products such as tall timber 

Sustainable living

Dr. Aleksandra Dulic
Associate Professor, Faculty of Creative and Critical Studies

  • Media for social change
  • Sustainable water practices
  • Human-water relationships in the Okanagan
  • Indigenous-led restoration initiatives 

Dr. Annamma Joy
Professor, Faculty of Management

  • Pollution generated by wine and fashion industries
  • Wine and fashion industry sustainability

Dr. Nathan Pelletier
Assistant Professor, Irving K. Barber Faculty of Science and Faculty of Management
NSERC/Egg Farmers of Canada Industrial Research Chair in Sustainability

  • Agricultural practices that rebuild healthy soil
  • Ecological impact of food production

About UBC's Okanagan campus

UBC’s Okanagan campus is an innovative hub for research and learning founded in 2005 in partnership with local Indigenous peoples, the Syilx Okanagan Nation, in whose territory the campus resides. As part of UBC—ranked among the world’s top 20 public universities—the Okanagan campus combines a globally recognized UBC education with a tight-knit and entrepreneurial community that welcomes students and faculty from around the world in British Columbia’s stunning Okanagan Valley.

To find out more, visit: ok.ubc.ca

Rebecca Chadney, this year's Pushor Mitchell LLP Gold Medal Leadership Prize winner.

Winner graduates with double-major in biochemistry and molecular biology and history

For as long as Rebecca Chadney can remember, she has loved both arts and sciences.

When deciding to pursue a career as a physician, she knew her path to medical school would depend on her success as an undergraduate science student — but, she wasn’t ready to let one passion take her away from another.

This week, Chadney graduates with a Bachelor of Science, double-majoring in biochemistry and molecular biology (medical and molecular biology option) and history. She celebrates the end of her undergraduate career as the recipient of the Pushor Mitchell LLP Gold Medal Leadership Prize.

The $10,000 prize, now in its 12th year, is the largest donor-funded award available to graduating Irving K. Barber Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences and Irving K. Barber Faculty of Science students. The award recognizes an individual who has excelled academically and demonstrated leadership while earning their degree.

Andrew Brunton, managing partner at Pushor Mitchell LLP, says the firm is proud to recognize the accomplishments of another exceptional UBC Okanagan student.

“We are thrilled to support Rebecca as she works towards her goal of becoming a physician, and we hope she will be able to continue her great work in the community,” says Brunton.

“We’re proud supporters of UBC Okanagan and are delighted to add Rebecca to the distinguished list of Pushor Mitchell LLP Gold Medal Leadership Prize winners.”

Originally from Langley, BC, Chadney relocated to Kelowna in 2016 to study at UBC Okanagan.

“I knew I wanted to move to a new city, to challenge myself, meet new people, and broaden my world view,” she says. “But, at the same time, I was coming from a small high school in the valley, so I didn’t want to feel like a number or a little fish in a big pond.”

Chadney focused exclusively on science in her first year, but often thought about pursuing a history minor once she was more adjusted to university life.

“I felt a little underprepared at first because although I went to a great high school, it wasn’t STEM-focused, so I didn’t have the lab experience that many of my peers had, and that was a bit stressful,” she explains.

“I was able to push through because I love science. I love learning about the body, and luckily, I was able to get the hang of labs pretty quickly.”

As a science student, Chadney was able to take an arts elective in her second year and registered for a history course with Associate Professor Dr. Jessica Stites-Mor. She was immediately hooked.

“The course was amazing, everything started clicking for me, and it was exactly what I thought university would be like,” recalls Chadney. “Dr. Stites-Mor encouraged me to pursue a minor, but after taking two more classes with her, I was like, okay, I have to double major.”

Chadney continued to study history alongside biochemistry and molecular biology, and ultimately applied for an Undergraduate Research Award with Assistant Professor of History Dr. Tim Paulson in 2020.

“Unfortunately, we didn’t get the award, but Dr. Paulson reached out and asked if I was interested in doing an honour’s thesis with him — and I said yes.”

Chadney’s thesis explored the role of women in Okanagan agriculture from 1890 to 1930.

“I love agriculture, gardening and plants, so it was a really cool opportunity to look at those things in the context of history and women’s studies,” she says.

Aside from her academic pursuits, Chadney is dedicated to community service, serving as president of the UBCO Unicef Club and volunteering for numerous organizations including the Kelowna Gospel Mission Dental Office, a clinic offering dental services to Kelowna’s most vulnerable population.

Chadney also worked as a chemistry teaching assistant, history research assistant, residence advisor, and played intramural sports throughout her time as a student.

Now, she’s looking forward to a well-deserved break before jumping into her next endeavour.

While UBC’s medical program is at the top of Chadney’s list, she’s open to others as long as she’s getting one step closer to her dream career.

Chadney is grateful for the strong support system she's had over the past five years, including mentor Dr. Paulson and her family. Especially her mother.

“My mom has been there for me through thick and thin — from my very first midterm to my very last final she was always there to encourage me and remind me to aim for progress, not perfection.”

“I want to thank Pushor Mitchell LLP for funding this award — their recognition and generosity gives me the financial freedom to prioritize my education,” she says.

As Chadney reflects on the last five years, she’s most proud of how much she’s grown as a person.

“I came to UBCO feeling really nervous and small, and now I’m leaving with a double-major in my two favourite subjects, a major award and the confidence that I can do anything I put my mind to — and that’s an empowering feeling.”

About UBC's Okanagan campus

UBC’s Okanagan campus is an innovative hub for research and learning founded in 2005 in partnership with local Indigenous peoples, the Syilx Okanagan Nation, in whose territory the campus resides. As part of UBC—ranked among the world’s top 20 public universities—the Okanagan campus combines a globally recognized UBC education with a tight-knit and entrepreneurial community that welcomes students and faculty from around the world in British Columbia’s stunning Okanagan Valley.

To find out more, visit: ok.ubc.ca

UBCO experts comment on sustainability practices of eggs and chocolate (Photo: Tetiana SHYSHKINA on Unsplash)

Sustainability experts comment on the environmental impacts of seasonal treats

The arrival of spring and Easter is often celebrated with egg-containing delicacies and all-things chocolate. The grocery shelves overflow with these temptations without much thought of how they arrived and the consequential environmental cost. Experts from UBCO’s Irving K. Barber Faculty of Science and Faculty of Management offer insight into the sustainability of these products and how to purchase wisely.

Of the major sources of terrestrial animal protein, eggs are the most sustainable says Dr. Nathan Pelletier, assistant professor of biology and management

“Hens are very efficient at converting feed into animal protein,” he explains. “In comparison to other animal protein sources, almost the entire product is edible. This, along with a long shelf-life, means that egg waste is very low.”

Dr. Pelletier adds that sustainable egg producers efficiently use limited natural resources, such as energy and water while minimizing emissions. They also ensure hen welfare, fair prices for farmers and are mindful of the social acceptability of this form of farming.

As NSERC/Egg Farmers of Canada Industrial Research Chair in Sustainability, Dr. Pelletier is examining the potential benefits of net-zero energy housing systems for the hens and the use of scrubbers to recover nitrogen from poultry barn exhaust air. He’s also studying the implementation of renewable energy systems such as wind, solar and geothermal heat pumps on farms.

“Eggs are the most affordable source of animal protein, with an average Canadian consuming about 21 dozen annually,” he says. “Because they play an important role in food and nutrition security, it is important to continually evaluate and seek opportunities to improve sustainability outcomes.”

“I believe consumers can use their purchasing power to support social change,” says Dr. Eric Li, associate professor of management, referring to supporting fair-trade chocolate

He adds that the International Labor Organization estimates millions of child labourers work to produce everyday purchases such as coffee and cocoa and that almost 284,000 children between the ages of nine and 12 have been reported working in hazardous conditions on West African cacao farms.

“These children are exploited by being forced to work long hours with little or no pay, and have little rights and limited education,” he says. “Also, the ongoing deforestation due to the growing demand for chocolate will contribute to climate change-related issues.”

Dr. Li notes these practices are not ethical or climate-friendly. Rather, he suggests organizations that support sustainable standards pay workers a fair wage and maintain critical forest conservation areas. They should also reduce pressures to convert more forestland to cacao plantations, and provide social and economic benefits to local communities.

Dr. Li also advocates for buying fair-trade chocolate, which is produced without child or forced labour. For making informed choices, he recommends reading the annual Easter Chocolate Shopping Guide. Compiled by the Mighty Earth environmental advocacy group, the guide assigns ‘Good Egg’ and ‘Rotten Egg’ awards to companies on a range of social and environmental criteria that can impact purchasing decisions.

“If everyone takes small steps to gradually change our consumption behaviour and mindsets, we will be on the right track of building a better world.”

About UBC's Okanagan campus

UBC’s Okanagan campus is an innovative hub for research and learning founded in 2005 in partnership with local Indigenous peoples, the Syilx Okanagan Nation, in whose territory the campus resides. As part of UBC—ranked among the world’s top 20 public universities—the Okanagan campus combines a globally recognized UBC education with a tight-knit and entrepreneurial community that welcomes students and faculty from around the world in British Columbia’s stunning Okanagan Valley.

To find out more, visit: ok.ubc.ca

UBCO researchers weigh in on heart mechanics, mating behaviour and the best romance novels

UBC Okanagan faculty put their hearts into research and teaching. To mark Valentine’s Day, they are highlighting their expertise on matters of the heart—from what makes it tick to how to keep the emotions pumping.

Advances in biomedical engineering and understanding of cardiovascular disease

Researchers from the School of Engineering and the Faculty of Health and Social Development are working on the development of mechanical heart valves and believe they are on the cusp of improving heart function.

A team of researchers at UBCO’s Heart Valve Performance Lab has developed a way to improve mechanical heart valves so they will match the real thing closely.

“Our goal is to create mechanical heart valves that perform consistently and seamlessly inside the human body,” explains Dr. Hadi Mohammadi, an associate professor at the School of Engineering. “The way blood travels through the body is unique to a person’s physiology, so a ‘one-size-fits-all’ valve has been a real challenge.”

Mohammadi adds that such advances in biomedical engineering can lead to innovative solutions for complex health issues such as heart disease.

**

An international research group at UBC, Harvard University and Cardiff Metropolitan University has discovered how the human heart has likely adapted to support endurance physical activities. For this, Dr. Rob Shave has taken an evolutionary step backwards by comparing the human heart’s structure and function with our closest ancestors, the great apes.

“We hope our research will inform those at highest risk of developing hypertensive heart disease,” says Shave, director of UBCO’s School of Health and Exercise Sciences. “And ensure that moderate-intensity endurance-type activities are widely encouraged in order to ultimately prevent premature deaths.”

According to Shave, cardiovascular disease is an ongoing global concern and that his research will further the understanding of how to improve the quality of lives of those affected.

Spiders need hearts too

It may be at odds with their creepy reputation, but spiders also have hearts.

“Spider hearts are actually in their abdomens,” says Dr. Matt Nelson, a lecturer in the Irving K. Barber Faculty of Science and resident spider expert. “Unlike our hearts, spider hearts are just tubes with arteries on either end and valves to prevent backflow. Hemolymph, their blood equivalent, is pumped out into the body cavity when the heart contracts; when [the heart] relaxes, hemolymph flows back into the heart through tiny holes called ostia. Often spiders have a mark on top of their abdomen called a heart mark.  The heart is right under that mark.”

Nelson adds that it’s important to understand the differences between species in order to better understand the role they all play in maintaining ecosystems.

Researchers explore how romance in the wild impacts wildlife populations

Animal courtship rituals, where an animal 'struts' its stuff for a partner, vary widely. As part of their research, graduate students of Dr. Adam Ford, assistant professor in the Faculty of Science, has observed some of these different mating strategies.

“Male cougars will spend three to 10 days with their prospective mate playing, as well as sharing meals and time together,” says Siobhan Darlington, an ecology doctoral student co-supervised by Ford and Dr. Karen Hodges. She explains that cougars can mate year-round, unlike many wild animals.

Fellow doctoral student and deer specialist Chloe Wright agrees. “Mule deer usually mate only in the fall and the pregnant doe will spend the winter months gestating, or supporting the growth of her fetuses. During the breeding season, male deer use their antlers to establish a hierarchy by fighting other male deer. The winner usually gets his pick of the females.”

Both researchers add that these rituals are all important in understanding how wildlife populations are maintained, how predator-prey interactions unfold and, most importantly, how sustainable wildlife protection practices can help ensure that our environments stay healthy and resilient.

What is the best romance read?

“Literature and the arts help us better appreciate the human experience,” says Dr. Marie Loughlin, associate professor of English in the Faculty of Creative and Critical Studies.

“Valentine’s Day is a great excuse to delve into one of the most important human emotions and reread foundational examples of literature, like Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice.”

She adds that her heart lies with books about the love of literature such as 84, Charing Cross Road, by Helene Hanff, which recounts a lifelong love affair with books. She also recommends A History of Reading by Alberto Manguel. “This captures the long history of our love of books and reading from antiquity to the present,” she suggests.

About UBC's Okanagan campus

UBC’s Okanagan campus is an innovative hub for research and learning founded in 2005 in partnership with local Indigenous peoples, the Syilx Okanagan Nation, in whose territory the campus resides. As part of UBC—ranked among the world’s top 20 public universities—the Okanagan campus combines a globally recognized UBC education with a tight-knit and entrepreneurial community that welcomes students and faculty from around the world in British Columbia’s stunning Okanagan Valley.

To find out more, visit: ok.ubc.ca

Researchers offer top tips for a healthy Halloween

Like so many other areas of life, Halloween festivities may look a little different this year in the midst of COVID-19. As health authorities ask people to take precautions and parents grapple with what is safe for their children, one thing remains constant: Kids love candy.

To help provide some relief, experts at UBC Okanagan are weighing in on what the best treats are and how to avoid being tricked by clever marketing.

Although sugar doesn’t cause diabetes, eat mindfully says Jonathan Little, associate professor in the Faculty of Health and Social Development's School of Health and Exercise Sciences

"One of the biggest nutrition myths is that sugar causes diabetes. Sugar intake alone won’t do this; the major risk factors for Type 2 diabetes are age, genetics and obesity. You obviously can’t do much about the first two but your lifestyle can influence your weight status. Excess calories from any source, combined with physical inactivity, can promote weight gain, which in turn, increases the risk for developing Type 2 diabetes.

Also, it is important to monitor sugar and carbohydrate intake for those who have Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. It should be routine to avoid foods with added sugars and refined carbohydrates. During holidays and festivities rather than reaching for sugary treats, look for those with higher protein and flavour, such as nuts, homemade granola or trail mix, or cheese. Not only will this most likely be healthier, they will also provide more sustained energy."

Sugar has many disguises, says Wesley Zandberg, assistant professor of chemistry in the Irving K. Barber Faculty of Science

"Sugar is a whole group of sweet-tasting carbohydrates that may often go by other names such as glucose, fructose, lactose, dextrose—anything with the ‘-ose’ ending. Although chemically different, the body sees them as the same, whether from a candy bar or in concentrated fruit juices. And all are very, very high sources of calories.

In the case of whole fruit, though, sugars are also found linked together to form dietary fibres which the body cannot digest and instead powers the good bacteria living in the human gut. So, stick with the whole fruit, not the concentrated juice!

And keep your eye on labels. Smuggled-in sugars could be listed as carbohydrates, fruit juice concentrate, corn, malt or maple syrup. When searching for sugar-free treats, don’t let the labels fool you and learn the sugar synonyms.”

Artificial sweeteners may be harmful to your good gut bacteria, says Deanna Gibson, an associate professor of biology in the Irving K. Barber Faculty of Science

"Artificial sweeteners are calorie-free synthetic sugar substitutes added to food and drinks to make them taste sweet. Although this seems like a good idea, there has been controversy around how healthy and safe these additives actually are. One of their side-effects is that they are toxic to the healthy bacteria in our guts, which are necessary for many bodily functions, including digestion and immunity. In fact, the consumption of these sweeteners has been associated with altering the gut bacteria, throwing off the immune and metabolic balance.

Recently, a study by Raylene Reimer at the University of Calgary has shown that maternal consumption of low-calorie sweeteners including aspartame and stevia during pregnancy pre-programs their offspring to gain weight. This study highlights that artificial sweeteners promote obesity-causing gut microbes that are passed from the mother to their babies.

While eating large amounts of sugar is not good for those with diabetes, eating artificial sugar substitutes are not a healthy alternative. My recommendation is to eat little processed food and enjoy small amounts of natural sugars on Halloween!"

About UBC's Okanagan campus

UBC’s Okanagan campus is an innovative hub for research and learning founded in 2005 in partnership with local Indigenous peoples, the Syilx Okanagan Nation, in whose territory the campus resides. As part of UBC—ranked among the world’s top 20 public universities—the Okanagan campus combines a globally recognized UBC education with a tight-knit and entrepreneurial community that welcomes students and faculty from around the world in British Columbia’s stunning Okanagan Valley.

To find out more, visit: ok.ubc.ca

Research suggests infant immunity may be compromised

Letting nature take its course may be the best advice for nursing mothers, according to researchers from UBC Okanagan. Their findings show taking fish oil supplements while nursing may not be beneficial and may even negatively impact babies’ immunity.

The study, published in the ISME Journal, is the first to investigate the impacts of fish oil supplementation on the composition of breast milk and infant gut bacteria.

Deanna Gibson, associate professor of biology.

“While maternal fish oil supplementation is widely believed to support infant health, the effect on gut microbiology is relatively unknown,” says senior author Deanna Gibson, an associate professor of biology in the Irving K. Barber Faculty of Science. “We demonstrated that supplementation corresponded with an increase in breast milk fats but a decrease in the immune-protective components of the milk. We also observed a change in infant gut microbiology—away from the bacteria normally present.”

For the study, Gibson and the research team evaluated 91 women and their babies; half took daily doses of fish oil while the other half did not supplement. Breast milk samples, infant stools and immune function markers were compared between the two groups.

Women who took supplements had a higher ratio of omega-3 fatty acids but lower protective molecules, such as antibodies, in their breast milk. The supplemented infants had a lower diversity of bacteria in their stools, something that is considered negative.

“We showed that fish oil supplementation decreases the critically important defence factors of breast milk, one of the only sources of immunity infants get during early life,” says former doctoral student and study co-author, Candice Quin. “We also showed that increased fatty acids in breast milk as a result of supplementation was associated with an altered composition of infant gut bacteria, both in numbers and diversity.”

“This is a change that could result in infection risk for the infant,” she warns.

With these findings in mind, Gibson cautions that the practice of prenatal fish oil supplementation may induce long-term dysfunctional gut immunity.

“We know that the gut microbiome is intricately linked to infant health,” she says. “Further large-scale studies will clarify whether early fish oil exposures alter infectious disease susceptibility, including persistent asymptomatic chronic infections.”

For more information about this study, visit Gibson’s blog.

Quin’s work was supported by funds from the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology and the Canadian Institute of Health Research. Gibson was supported by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Crohn’s and Colitis Canada and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

About UBC's Okanagan campus

UBC’s Okanagan campus is an innovative hub for research and learning founded in 2005 in partnership with local Indigenous peoples, the Syilx Okanagan Nation, in whose territory the campus resides. As part of UBC—ranked among the world’s top 20 public universities—the Okanagan campus combines a globally recognized UBC education with a tight-knit and entrepreneurial community that welcomes students and faculty from around the world in British Columbia’s stunning Okanagan Valley.

To find out more, visit: ok.ubc.ca

UBCO experts offer tips on how to camp and hike cleanly.

Experts offer advice on how to enjoy nature in an eco-friendly way

The last long weekend of the summer is approaching and many will seek refuge in nature. However, this doesn’t bring comfort to all. Conservationists and border communities on provincial and national parks are concerned about increased visits and cavalier attitudes toward protected spaces.

Experts from UBCO’s Irving K. Barber Faculty of Science offer a few suggestions on how to leave only footprints behind for campers, hikers and nature enthusiasts.

Think about wastewater, says Jeff Curtis, associate professor, earth, environmental and geographic sciences

“All our waste, liquid or otherwise, that we leave behind seeps into the ecosystem. Lakes, rivers and other bodies of water can easily become polluted with so many people washing, rinsing and flushing.

Consider using biodegradable soap and toothpaste. Also, be aware of where you dispose of liquid waste. Be at least 60 metres away from any body of water and think of humans and wildlife downstream.”

Mind the rules and be respectful, says Kevin Hanna, associate professor, earth, environmental and geographic sciences and director of UBC’s Centre for Environmental Assessment Research

“Be considerate of our Indigenous communities and their land—we are guests. Rules for hunting, fishing, and land and water vehicles are there for a reason—to protect BC’s natural environments for future generations.

Know the rules and stick to them. It’s especially important this year as more people are using the backcountry, and many are trying new outdoor activities.

All wild animals should be treated with care and caution; no matter how big or small they are. Be respectful of wildlife and help protect their habitats. We are visitors to their homes.”

Be fire-smart, says Mathieu Bourbonnais, assistant professor, earth, environmental and geographic sciences

“We have been very fortunate with the limited number of wildfires this summer. However, just because there aren’t fire bans in place doesn’t mean we can relax on fire safety. Wildfire risk changes quickly and a few sparks from an ATV or a campfire in the right conditions can quickly lead to an uncontrolled blaze.

Campfire restrictions can occur at any time so be aware and be prepared. If you are lucky enough to roast marshmallows, keep the fire in the pit, keep it manageable and pour water on the coals and stir them to fully extinguish it.”

Leave no trace, says Lael Parrott, professor in sustainability and director of the Okanagan Institute for Biodiversity, Resilience and Ecosystem Services

“It is intuitive to pack out what you pack in, but this also applies to materials like banana and orange peels which decompose slowly. Also, stay on the trail. This may be slow-going and frustrating if you’re behind someone, but vegetation that gets trampled may never recover. Keep your groups small and be mindful of others when stopping to pose and snap.

Be sure to only camp in designated areas to avoid trampling vegetation and use outhouses and wastewater disposal pits where available to protect nearby streams and lakes. Alpine plants have a very short growing season and survive in especially difficult conditions. Many people straying from designated tent sites and trails can have a large cumulative impact on the backcountry environment.

Before heading out, have a back-up plan so that if a trail or campsite is too busy, you can visit another. BC and other provinces have many beautiful spots to explore; seek out the less well-known ones that can accommodate your group enjoy the wonder.”

About UBC's Okanagan campus

UBC’s Okanagan campus is an innovative hub for research and learning founded in 2005 in partnership with local Indigenous peoples, the Syilx Okanagan Nation, in whose territory the campus resides. As part of UBC—ranked among the world’s top 20 public universities—the Okanagan campus combines a globally recognized UBC education with a tight-knit and entrepreneurial community that welcomes students and faculty from around the world in British Columbia’s stunning Okanagan Valley.

To find out more, visit: ok.ubc.ca